On the importance of accuracy in scientific illustrations (or sculptures)

A few weeks ago, I had a one-hour phone conversation with my friend Jacqueline Parada on how we are constantly encountering new details on the forms of the organisms that we are drawing or sculpting. She is also a scientists, illustrator and a ceramic sculptor and we both spend quite a lot of time observing organisms under the microscope, identifying their forms, reading scientific papers, looking at SEM images and then translating all that visual information into an illustration or sculpture. It is actually nice to be able to talk about these things with someone that knows exactly what you are talking about. The conversations can go something like this: “What are those dots in the drawing of the identification key…are they holes or bumps?”, “Well, I asked a person from my lab that studies them and she said that it is a depression on the surface, that most drawings represent them inaccurately, and that those depressions are gradual, not steep”, “did you check the SEM image?.. is that ruffle a product of the dehydration of the sample or they are actually like this?”, “I can not really tell”. We were specifically talking about the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, because I am working on a sculpture of it and because it has been on the news lately due to the critical red tide phenomenon that occurred in Chile last May. In spite of the terrible consequences for humans, these organisms are quite amazing and beautiful creatures, and the more you look at them, the more things you see.

 

Image of Alexandrium catenella from the "Online" Culture collection of micro-algae (http://cultures.cawthron.org.nz/ciccm/index.php?-table=cultures&-action=browse&id=%3D70)

Image of Alexandrium catenella from the “Online” Culture collection of micro-algae (http://cultures.cawthron.org.nz/ciccm/index.php?-table=cultures&-action=browse&id=%3D70)

 

That day I was working on reproducing the cellulose plates of the “theca” (= the hard armored that protects this unicellular organisms), which are essential to anyone who wants to identify the different species. For example, if you would like to know if the species under the microscope is A. catenella or a relative, you will need to learn the names and shapes of some of the plates, like Po, cp, 4’, 0a, 6” and 5’”.

Figures from the book "The genus Alexandrium" by Enrique Balech, published in 1995 by the publisher Sherkin Island Marine Station. The illustration show the anatomy and nomenclature used to refer to the plates of this dinoflagellate.

Figures from the book “The genus Alexandrium” by Enrique Balech, published in 1995 by the publisher Sherkin Island Marine Station. The illustration show the anatomy and nomenclature used to refer to the plates of this dinoflagellate.

This process of learning to see again, to learn what features are characteristic of a species and which are not, to learn a little bit about the extensive list of technical terms associated with the morphology or behavior of a group of organisms, it is a completely indispensable process to do a useful scientific illustration. Moreover, this process in never ending, because the information changes through time and with the development of new tools that help as see and understand better the characteristics of the organisms we are studying. At times, what we had drawn many times thinking that it was one species, ends up being three different species.

 

What are you drawing? Is that accurate?

 

There is a long history, and not always conciliatory, on what is the “right” approach on how and what to draw when representing organisms in scientific illustrations, but at the end, as in any other form of communication, it depends on a large extent on the purpose of the drawing. Although ambiguity seems to be essential in the art world, accuracy is essential in the science world. That does not mean that a scientific illustration is “The Truth” about something, with capital “T”, but more like a little tentative, best-to-my-knowledge truth, given the research that has been conducted so far. Most importantly, this “little truth” is ALWAYS subject to scrutiny by others based on new data and their interpretation. In other words, scientific illustrations are hypothesis, visual hypothesis.

 

Scientific illustrations are hypothesis, visual hypothesis

 

According to the philosophical view of science at a given time, or the practical use that the scientist or illustrator will give to the image, the type of representation of the organisms, organs, tissues, or cells can shift substantially. Now a days, most frequently, scientific illustrations represent the “hypothetical average individual”, or the “representative individual”, but at other times they represent the anomalous, the unique case, the one-and-only case known about something. Independent of this, an illustrator will always start by looking at many individuals, reading the description of the species, taking notes, understanding what is “normal” and what is not, if there are geographic variations in the form of this species and so on. Then, by combining all the information and selecting what is relevant according to the purpose of the illustration, she will draw that “average individual” highlighting the key features that characterize this species and that separates it from close related ones.

Digital illustration of the key characteristics of the sea snail Prisogaster niger. By Fernanda X. Oyarzun

Digital illustration that shows the key characteristics of the sea snail Prisogaster niger. By Fernanda X. Oyarzun

This scientific illustration might end up looking like a photograph (if that is the style she is going for), but it will be very different from a photograph: it will be a visual summary of information. Taking the time to do thoughtful research on the species, will ensure that no critical mistakes are made, like drawing 5-legged insects, or drawing a hole in a shell as part of its features, when it is actually the result of predation by other snails. Usually, given that it is imposible to become an expert in everything, it is very usefull to be able to correspond, show drafts and brainstorm with researchers specialized in the particular topic, and get their feedback. I have literally taken wet clay sculptures to the lab of a few scientists to get feedback, and most often they are excited to see their organisms taking form in 3D. It is quite interesting too, that most often we both learn in the process, because this dialogue brings to light aspects of the organism that the researcher might not have asked herself before.

 

This scientific illustration might end up looking like a photograph (if that is the style she is going for), but it will be very different from a photograph: it will be a visual summary of information

 

The process itself will not be very different if the intention is to do a series of illustrations conveying a full range of stages, variations over time or variation within the species, such as when showing sexual dimorphism, polymorphism, plasticity or different parts of a life cycle. In those cases the illustrator will also look at many individuals, but she will highlight the difference within the species. Actually, even if the objective is to draw and document a particular case, the illustrator would have to learn about what is “normal” to be able to highlight those key aspects of this particular individual that makes it different.

 

Overall, the key to  creating a useful scientific illustration is that you can not skip the research: knowledge and accuracy are essential.  It is rarely enough to draw something based on a single photo downloaded from the web, even if we think we know the shape, color or trait of that organism. Also, avoid doing an illustration exclusively based on other illustrations, as they tend to amplify mistakes in a sort of visual “telephone game”.

What happens when preliminary research and accuracy fails? 

 

Images create realities and shape our thinking about the specific organisms or processes portraited. Scientific illustrations are used by professors, doctors, students, technicians, researchers, nature lovers and the general public, to connect what they are seeing or what they will see with what is known, and that connection can help us, but it can also blind us, or bias us. To do a scientific illustration is a responsibility because we might be unintentionally affecting how the public, students, and other scientists visualize (or not) certain scientific questions, processes or organisms. In the process of making scientific illustrations, we take decisions on what to show and how to show it, and we will leave a lot of information out. The goal is to make intentional decisions with the best possible information.

 

Scientific illustrations are used by professors, doctors, students, technicians, researchers, nature lovers and the general public to connect what they are seeing or what they will see with what is known, and that connection can help us, but also blind us, or bias us.

 

Personally, I usually go through the process of defining the purpose of the scientific illustration or sculpture first. I decide if the image will be used for teaching, for a field guide, for a talk, for an infographic, or as part as an art installation or project (in that case I have more freedom in the “accuracy” aspect, but it still implies that I am trying to communicate a specific concept about the species). Then, I start researching, doing exploratory drawings, checking samples in museum collection, in the wild, under the microscope, in live organism, videos, other illustrations or book descriptions, and hopefully I will talk or correspond with other researchers that work with that species. Also, I frequently and unintentionally revisit the never ending and always fascinating discussion of what is a species, I learn some of the vocabulary associated to that particular taxa, I learn about the diagnostic characteristics of it and the variation that is present, but most importantly I look with my own eyes whenever possible, and get a sense of what there is and what we think we know about it. Overall, the more I draw (or sculpt) the more I see and the more I question the final piece I created. Scientific illustrations are visual hypothesis and as such, they are tentative; but it is my hope that by doing preliminary research and by being intentional on the decisions I take while doing them, I might (temporarily) create useful tools.

 

[a continuación texto en español]

Hace algunas semanas, conversé por teléfono durante una hora con mi amiga Jacqueline Parada, sobre cómo encontramos constantemente nuevos detalles en las formas de los organismos que estamos dibujando o esculpiendo. Ella también es científica, ilustradora y escultora en cerámica y las dos pasamos mucho tiempo observando organismos bajo el microscopio, identificando sus formas, leyendo artículos científicos, observando imágenes obtenidas a través de SEM y luego integrando toda esa información visual en una ilustración o una escultura. En realidad, es bueno poder hablar de estas cosas con alguien que sabe exactamente de lo que estás hablando. Las conversaciones pueden ser más o menos así: “¿Sabes qué representan los puntos negros en el dibujo de la clave de identificación … ¿son hoyos o granos”, “Le pregunté a una persona de mi laboratorio que los estudia y dijo que se trata de una depresión en la superficie, que la mayoría de los dibujos representan esto incorrectamente, y que esas depresiones son graduales, no abruptas”,”¿ y sabes si esa rugosidad de la superficie en la imagen SEM es normal o es producto del proceso de deshidratación de la muestra? “,” no sé realmente”. Esta vez estábamos hablando específicamente sobre el dinoflagelado Alexandrium catenella, porque estoy trabajando en una escultura sobre esta especie y porque Alexandrium ha estado en las noticias últimamente debido al crítico fenómeno de la marea roja que afectó las costas de Chile en Mayo. A pesar de las terribles consecuencias para los seres humanos, estos organismos son criaturas realmente sorprendentes y hermosas, y entre más las observo, más detalles y estructuras veo.

 

Ese día, estaba específicamente trabajando en reproducir las placas de la “teca” (=la armadura de celulosa que protege a este organismo unicelular), las cuales son esenciales para quien quiera identificar las distintas especies. Por ejemplo, si quisieras saber si lo que estás viendo bajo el microscopio es A. catenella u otra especie parecida, tendrías que poder reconocer las formas de las placas llamadas: Po, cp, 4’, 0a, 6” y 5’”. Este proceso de aprender a ver nuevamente, de aprender que características son específicas de una especie y cuales no, y de aprender algo del extenso vocabulario técnico que han generado los investigadores que estudian distintos grupos de organismos, es completamente indispensable si quieres crear una ilustración científica que sea de utilidad. De hecho, este proceso nunca se termina, ya que la información cambia con el tiempo a medida que nuevas herramientas nos permiten ver y entender mejor las formas de estos organismos. Otras veces, lo que dibujamos muchas veces pensando que era una especie, termina siendo tres especies distintas.

 

¿Qué estás dibujando? ¿Qué tan exacto es el dibujo?

 

Existe una larga historia sobre cuál es la manera “correcta” de representar organismos en ilustraciones científicas; sin embargo, al final, cómo en cualquier otra forma de comunicación, depende en gran parte del propósito de la misma. Aunque la ambigüedad puede ser esencial en el arte, la exactitud es lo esencial en la ciencia. Eso no significa que una ilustración científica representa “La Verdad” sobre algo, más bien representa una pequeña verdad, tentativa, y sujeta al conocimiento que se tiene en ese momento de la problemática según la investigación que hay disponible. Esa pequeña verdad está SIEMPRE sujeta al escrutinio de otros basado en nuevos datos e investigaciones. En otras palabras, las ilustraciones científicas son hipótesis, hipótesis visuales.

 

Las ilustraciones científicas son hipótesis, hipótesis visuales.

 

De acuerdo a la filosofía predominante en la ciencia en un determinada época, o al uso práctico que el científico o ilustrador le de a la imagen, el tipo de representación del organismo, órgano, tejido, o célula puede variar sustancialmente. Hoy en día, en su mayoría, las ilustraciones científicas representan al “individuo promedio hipotético”, o a un “individuo representativo”, pero en otras ocasiones puede representar algo anómalo, a un caso único, o al único caso conocido sobre algo. Independientemente de esto, un ilustrador comenzará el proceso de investigación mirando a muchos individuos, leyendo descripciones de la especies, tomando notas, entendiendo qué es “normal” y que cosas no lo son, explorando la literatura para saber si hay variaciones geográficas y así sucesivamente. Sólo entonces, combinando toda la información recolectada y lo aprendido, ella dibujará al “individuo promedio” destacando aquellas características relevantes de esa especie y que las separan de especies relacionadas.

 

Aunque una ilustración científica creada de esta manera pueda terminar asemejándose a una fotografía (si ese es el estilo que se ha elegido), será muy distinta a una foto: será un resumen visual de información. Al tomarse el tiempo de investigar lo que se sabe de una especie antes de comenzar la ilustración, un ilustrador se asegurará de no cometer errores críticos, como hacer dibujos de organismos incompletos si esa no es la intención (insectos de 5 patas por ejemplo), o dibujar características circunstanciales como si fueran propias de la especie (un agujero en una concha que es producto de depredación por ejemplo). Usualmente, dado que es imposible convertirse en un experto en todo, es muy útil establecer contacto con algún investigador especialista en el tema, y poder mostrarle borradores, hacer consultas e intercambiar ideas. En un par de ocasiones he llevado esculturas en arcilla aún húmedas al laboratorio de un investigador para hacer preguntas puntuales de formas o estructuras. En general los investigadores se entusiasman al ver cómo su organismo predilecto va tomando forma en 3D y de hecho la visita termina en un aprendizaje mutuo, ya que hay veces que pregunto cosas que ni ellos mismos se habían planteado.

 

Aunque una ilustración científica creada de esta manera pueda terminar asemejándose a una fotografía (si ese es el estilo que se ha elegido), será muy distinta a una foto: será un resumen visual de información.

 

El proceso en sí, no será muy diferente si lo que se quiere es hacer una serie de ilustraciones que muestren diversas etapas de desarrollo, o variaciones dentro de la especie como dimorfismo sexual, polimorfismo, plasticidad o distintas etapas del ciclo de vida. En estos casos el ilustrador también tendrá que mirar múltiples individuos, pero esta vez se enfocará en las diferencias que existen dentro de la especie. De hecho, incluso cuando el objetivo es documentar un caso en particular, el ilustrador deberá aprender sobre qué es “normal” para así poder destacar aquellos aspectos que hacen a ese individuo diferente.

 

En general, la clave para crear una ilustración científica que sea de utilidad es no saltarse el proceso previo de investigación: el conocimiento y la exactitud son esenciales. Muy pocas veces, será suficiente basarse en una única fotografía bajada de internet para  realizar una ilustración científica. Probablemente, también es una buena idea evitar el hacer una ilustración basándose exclusivamente en otra ilustración (lo que es bastante más frecuente de lo que se pudiera pensar), ya que se corre el riesgo de amplificar errores en una suerte de “juego del teléfono” visual.

 

¿Que sucede cuando la investigación preliminar o la exactitud fallan?

 

Las imágenes crean realidades y moldean nuestro pensar sobre los organismos y procesos que representan. Las ilustraciones científicas son utilizadas por profesores, doctores, técnicos de laboratorio, investigadores, amantes de la naturaleza y el público en general para conectar lo que observan o lo que observarán con el conocimiento que se tiene de ellos, y esa conexión puede ayudarnos, pero también puede sesgarnos. El hacer una ilustración científica es una responsabilidad ya que puede, sin quererlo, afectar como visualizan (o no) la naturaleza y sus problemáticas, tanto el público en general, como estudiantes y otros científicos. En la creación de ilustraciones científicas, tomamos desiciones sobre qué mostrar y cómo mostrarlo, y en el proceso dejaremos mucha información afuera. El objetivo debiera ser que estas decisiones sean intencionales e informadas y no accidentales.

 

Las ilustraciones científicas son utilizadas por profesores, doctores, técnicos de laboratorio, investigadores, amantes de la naturaleza y el público en general para conectar lo que observan o lo que observarán con el conocimiento que se tiene de ellos, y esa conexión puede ayudarnos, pero también pueden sesgarnos.

 

Personalmente, comienzo mis ilustraciones y esculturas definiendo el propósito para el cuál las estoy realizando. Decido si la imagen será utilizada para la enseñanza, para una guía de campo, para una charla, como parte de una infografía, o como parte de una instalación o proyecto artístico (en este último caso tengo una mayor libertad en términos de la exactitud científica, obviamente, pero de igual manera generalmente estoy tratando de comunicar algún concepto o idea). Luego, comienzo a investigar, a hacer dibujos exploratorios, a revisar muestras de museos, en la naturaleza, bajo el microscopio, a través de videos, en otras ilustraciones de libros, a leer descripciones de la especie, y a conversar o a escribirle a algún investigador que trabaje con la especie en cuestión. Generalmente, sin realmente buscarlo, vuelvo a meditar sobre el siempre interesante debate de qué es una especie, aprendo sobre un grupo de organismos en particular, sobre sus características y la variación que está presente en ella, pero aún más importante que todo esto, miro con mis propios ojos y comienzo a tener una idea, una percepción de lo que hay y de lo que creemos saber sobre esta especie. Entre más ilustraciones o esculturas hago, más detalles veo al volver a mirar a un organismo, y más cuestiono la imagen creada. Las ilustraciones científicas son hipótesis visuales y como hipótesis, son tentativas, pero es mi esperanza que a través de hacer una investigación consciente previamente, y a través de tomar decisiones intencionales e informadas pueda crear imágenes que sean —aunque sea temporalmente— herramientas de ayuda.